Injury Prevention

Thoracic mobility is one of the most important mobility drills for the fitness athlete. The thoracic spine plays a huge role in keeping the shoulders and the lumbar spine working properly, and pain free. To test thoracic mobility, I look at rotation each direction. This lets me know if there is a unilateral restriction. Limited rotation also means there will be decreased extension in the thoracic spine.For a full thoracic spine mobility plan, check out my THORACIC MOBILITY OVERHAUL PROGRAM.

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Over the past two months, my clean has gone from 275lbs to 295lbs! Given that I’ve been weightlifting for a long time, this big of a jump in such a short period is really great! hip internal rotationWhat’s even better is that I did this without significantly changing my training plan! (My normal CrossFit routine).More impressive, in the six months prior to this my clean only improved ten pounds. So in one-third of the time, I doubled my gains!So how did I gain so much more in less time? I simply improved my hip internal rotation!

Dr. E of themanualtherapist.com recently shared a video for assessing lateral tibial glide which is commonly restricted in those with ankle mobility restrictions, knee collapse during squat patterns, or knee pain. Since he posted I have made this a regular part of my assessment. See it...

The handstand provides an excellent opportunity to examine an athlete's mobility and motor control abilities. Have the athlete assume a handstand position with their front side facing a wall and toes pointed. Watch for the following: wrists extended so that the forearm is near vertical,...

Last week's Mobility Minute covered the Hip Hinge pattern and how to assess if an athlete has difficulty loading the hips without putting the spine in poor positions. Closely related to the hip hinge is the need for adequate hamstring flexibility. Without proper hamstring flexibility, maintaining...

Tightness in the latissimus dorsi (lats) muscles is one of the most common dysfunctions I see in athletes. Lat tightness contributes to both decreased overhead mobility and excessive arching of the lower back (as a compensation). Testing lat flexibility is very easy. Compare the amount...

Glenohumeral Internal Rotation Deficit (or GIRD for short) is defined as loss of internal rotation of the shoulder while positioned in 90 degrees of abduction. This is a commonly restricted motion in athletes that is important to address. In overhead athletes, loss of this motion puts...