The 8 Best Snatch Mobility Movements - The Barbell Physio
 

The 8 Best Snatch Mobility Movements

improve your snatch mobility

The 8 Best Snatch Mobility Movements

The snatch is the fastest of all weightlifting movements. But, it is also the most mobility demanding exercise. Many athletes struggle with this movement due to their inability to get into good positioning. The following exercises are our favorite to improve your snatch mobility and get you lifting more weight!

For a complete program designed to improve your mobility for the snatch, check out our Overhead Squat Overhaul program inside of Performance Plus Programming.

The most important areas to focus on for improving your snatch mobility are your ankles, thoracic spine (upper back), and your lats.

Ankle Mobility Drills

Ankle mobility is perhaps the most important area to address to improve your snatch mobility. As I discussed in my article “The Ultimate Guide to Improving Your Overhead Squat” when ankle mobility is limited the entire body must compensate. The below video demonstrates this idea.

On the left, you will see a box blocking my ankles to simulate poor flexibility. Look at how much that makes my torso lean forward. And as a result, makes my shoulders go into some extreme range of motion. So, making sure your ankle mobility is great is necessary.

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LET'S TALK ABOUT THE OVERHEAD SQUAT…⁠ .⁠ Having lots of mobility is key to being as efficient as possible in this very difficult squat variation. And ankle mobility is one of the most important areas to address.⁠ .⁠ On the left you'll see me performing the overhead squat with a box limiting my forward knee translation. This simulates someone with stiff ankles. Notice how this forces my trunk to lean forward more which then leads to my shoulders having to go into a TON of abduction / flexion. This position makes it harder to stabilize weight and puts a lot more stress on the anterior shoulder.⁠ .⁠ On the right notice how I drive my knees forward, keep a more upright torso, and an overall better stacked position. This is what we want to see.⁠ .⁠ Does your overhead squat need some fixin'??? Check out my latest article "The Ultimate Guide to Improving Your Overhead Squat" available at https://thebarbellphysio.com/ultimate-guide-to-improving-your-overhead-squat/⁠ .⁠ We also have several programs to improve your mobility for this movement inside of @performanceplusprogram⁠ .⁠ Thanks @fitnishdoc for setting me up for this breakdown using @simi_reality_motion_systems⁠ ⁠ ⁠ #mobility #flexibility #crossfit #cltfitlife #thebarbellphysio #fitness #overheadsquat #fitness #squat #mobilitywod

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Calf Eccentrics 

My starting point for most mobility plans is to use eccentrics. The combination of strength and rapid mobility changes we see with these makes them a great technique to employ. Notice with this drill how I perform with the knee straight and then bent to hit both of the two calf muscles.

 

Goblet Dorsiflexion

I love this goblet squat stretch because it not only stretches the ankles but helps athletes feel more comfortable with a forward knee position squat that we need for solid snatch mobility.

Lats & Shoulder Drills for Snatch Mobility

Second to the ankles, lat flexibility is essential for good snatch mobility. But, when stiff, we will see a number of compensations such as a poor overhead position and an overextended back.

Lat Eccentrics

The combination of an externally rotated shoulder position plus hip flexion really ties the lats up. Add a light weight for an eccentric load and you have a fantastic overhead squat mobility drill with this one.

 

Band Squat Y’s

I love these to build up the muscles of the rotator cuff and upper back that help open the shoulders up for a good snatch receiving position.

 

Band Overhead Squat

This may be my favorite snatch mobility drill. Taught to me by National Champion Olympic lifter James Tatum, this drill really helps to open the shoulders up. Put a light resistance band behind your head and then grab a bar/PVC with a narrow grip, then squat. The band forces an active, full overhead position. These will humble many athletes.

 

Thoracic Spine Mobility

When the upper back is stiff, having a good overhead position is difficult. These two drills do a fantastic job of improving snatch mobility.

Prayer Stretch

When you perform this common drill, make sure you focus on extending your upper back to focus on thoracic spine mobility. Because, if you keep your back slightly rounded, this will become a lat stretch. By focusing technique of this mobility drill on where you are tight, you will the most out of your time.

 

Upper Thoracic Extension with Overpressure

Adding a light weight to the traditional foam roller thoracic extensions takes the standard mobility drill to the next level.

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Need some thoracic spine mobility for a better overhead position? To decrease neck tension? To improve mid back pain?⁠ .⁠ Here's a great mobilization technique from @jordanberrydpt @onwardclt⁠ .⁠ Put feet up on a wall with knees and hips flexed to 90 degrees. Position your foam roller perpendicular to your spine in the upper back (usually working a few different levels). Grad a kettlebell or dumbbell and hold it behind your head for some added overpressure as you extend your upper back over the foam roller. Be sure to follow up with some active movement and strength work to help your improved mobility "stick".⁠ .⁠ TAG A FRIEND THAT NEEDS TO TRY THIS MOVEMENT⁠ .⁠ ⁠ #mobility #flexibility #fitness #weightlifting #gym #workout #bodybuilding #crossfit #olympicweightlifting #strength #stronger #thebarbellphysio #headaches #neckpain #overheadmobility

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Hip Mobility

Hip mobility is also important to improving your snatch mobility. My favorite drill is the posterior capsule mobilization shown here.

 

If your snatch mobility needs serious help check out the following programs:

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