Improving Overhead Strength & Stability

Improving Overhead Strength & Stability

Overhead stability is often a problem in the fitness athlete leading to lots of missed reps in exercises like the snatch and jerks. This week’s episode focuses on three great exercises you can implement for Improving Overhead Strength & Stability.

Want a done-for-you program for improving overhead strength?

What’s going on everybody? Dr. Zach Long from thebarbellphysio.com. Welcome to today’s episode. We’re going to be talking a little bit about Improving Overhead Strength & Stability. If you’re somebody, maybe you have strong legs, you can pick a lot of weight up off the ground, you can get it overhead, but you can’t stabilize it in your snatch or your split jerk, this is the episode for you. We’re going to go over three great drills to help you have a stronger overhead position.

We’re going to start with the face pull wide press to overhead squat. I’m going to use my crossover symmetry bands. You can rig up any other bands that you have that you want to use. As I do this, I’m going to start with holding the bands out in front of me. I’m going to pole to this 90/90 position, and then I’m going to press my arms up to a snatch. After I get that snatch grip in the top I’m going to go into an overhead squat. Improving Overhead Strength & Stability

Up next we’re going to get a kettle bell overhead. You can walk with it. You can do some lunges with it, some overhead squats. Doesn’t matter what you do. Let’s just spend some time with the kettle bell overhead trying to get that entire arm as vertical as possible keeping your wrist in a good position, keep the core tight. Improving Overhead Strength & Stability

Finally, we’re going to use a little bit of stability training. I’ve got a couple of kettle bells hooked up to this PVC pipe with some resistance bands. I can do presses. We can do some overhead squats, or you can just walk. That band with the kettle bells hanging from it’s going to make this a really unstable movement and make you really have to non-stop react to the movements of the weight and stabilize.